The Art of Natural Dressage

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 Post subject: Hempfling
PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2007 10:10 pm 
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I don't know how many of you have read his books. I have mixed feelings about the methods he ascribes, but only in a small way as they are very easy to adapt to lessen the intensity of the moment (body language), and one of course never has to go the bit as he does. I find his books enjoyable though...a little poetic and artistic, and I really appreciate the extent to which he covers body language and being aware of how you move and the energy you give off. And balance for riding of course...one can't ready too much about balance.

The most useful of two I have read is "Dancing with Horses". But I have also enjoyed reading "What Horses Reveal". I don't know how accurate his descriptions of the various personality types are. I haven't met that many horses in my life. But it was interesting to try and figure out which personality type Cisco is closest to. After a couple of months of reading, re-reading, and studying Cisco and the descriptions, I have come to the conclusion that he is best described by the one called "Minister". And in reading that description, over and over again, I am very honored to be Cisco's friend. That every day he lets me in a little farther, and over time has decided that I'm worthy, or nearly so.

I had thought that of all the descriptions in the book, the horse I would most like to play with is the "King". Suited to high school work, high spirited, but one that likes to learn and is less mentally complicated than the Minister. I really think that this (and the physical description) is very much what Tamarack is. Or perhaps it's just wishful thinking...but we'll see. It is an entertaining book if nothing else, that gets you thinking about how to approach teaching to various personality types.


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PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2007 4:39 pm 
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Ow the books are great. Not everything is usefull, but a lot of things are!

I've seen a film of him also, it's so great to see him working with his horses!


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2007 8:18 am 
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"Dancing with Horses" was the first thing I ever was exposed to that wasn't "traditional." The promise it held fascinated me, but lack of practical instruction frustrated me (hmmm, sounds like NHE!). But because of that book I rode my horse at the time (my show jumper) bareback and with a halter for nine months. I concentrated on using body language on the ground and in the saddle. Than I found PNH which of course had lots more instruction. And all that somehow led me here.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2007 8:24 am 
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I think that is wat Klaus intended.. that you find out on your own and let your horse(s) instruct you.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2007 9:07 pm 
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Yes Josepha, I really think it is.
But that part isn't easy. It's a way you have to go together, and you have to listen really careful to the best teacher you work with, your horse!


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 17, 2007 11:25 pm 

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I have both of Hempfling's books and both his videos. There is a ton of info and constantly putting it down and picking it up, weeks later.

A lot he has to say, needs time to sink in. He shows you but it's still between you and your horse. It's a matter of finding what works.

April

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2007 1:13 pm 
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Actually it worked the same with Mr. Nevzorov for me.
He opened my eyes as to tack was not needed for HE.

I wanted to have him 'instruct me' and while I was hoping to enter the school, through the heated discussion I realised I did not need to enter anymore..

Now I am so happy for I found out that the only guidence I need is from the horses themselves.

I look up at the great masters only for inspiration now :)

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2007 2:08 pm 
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I think Henpfling is great. His books are interesting, I've found a lot of good things in there. I also like that he gives you some food for thoughts, he doesn't tell you everything but let you think about it myself. Those methods work for me, I don't like to be told what to do exactly That's probably why I was never really interested in Parelli whose program is too strict for me. Hempfling has the beautiful talent to be good with horses and also respect humans (something some other great horseman have problems with :roll: )


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2007 3:10 pm 
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Quote:
I don't like to be told what to do exactly


Funny you should say that. In your diary this morning, I was thinking, you need to explore what is possile with Amiro in your own way, yes? Not in a structured lesson. I would even go so far as to say that it's not that you are NOT interested in riding, it's just that with a limited amount of time to spend with Amiro, you don't want to waste it being told what to do?

I like the freedom of expression that Hempfling teaches as well...not just for the horse, but for the human as well!


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2007 10:47 pm 
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It is interesting what you mentionned about Parelli. His method is strict with tasks organized in level and summed up in booklets...

A friend of mine was once invited at a Public Relation and Marketing conference in New York and at the banquet she was sitting at the same table as Linda Parelli.

Linda told her that their method was primarily designed for the baby boomers who are tasks oriented and need to have goals in most of the things they do. That is what attracted me to it. But I realized the shortcomings of always having a goal and asking the horse to do something.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2007 3:50 pm 
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Karen wrote:
Quote:
I don't like to be told what to do exactly


Funny you should say that. In your diary this morning, I was thinking, you need to explore what is possile with Amiro in your own way, yes? Not in a structured lesson. I would even go so far as to say that it's not that you are NOT interested in riding, it's just that with a limited amount of time to spend with Amiro, you don't want to waste it being told what to do?

I like the freedom of expression that Hempfling teaches as well...not just for the horse, but for the human as well!


Wow Karen. You can put everything in such a good way into words. I had no idea how to say it, but I feel exactly like you described here. It's right, that's what I like about Hempfling, but also about NHE and of course about AND :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2007 9:56 pm 
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[quote="Madeleine Balcer" Linda told her that their method was primarily designed for the baby boomers who are tasks oriented and need to have goals in most of the things they do. That is what attracted me to it. But I realized the shortcomings of always having a goal and asking the horse to do something.[/quote]

That is really interesting. I agree though, it's where Parelli and similar can go wrong. If you couldn't manage to do your seven games in seven minutes then it would feel like a failure. Which is missing the point of trying to improve your relationship with your horse.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 12:48 am 
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Well, I didn't bring up Parelli, but you know I can't pass the discussion by!! When I started "doing Parelli" (I hate that phrase!) I didn't go, "Okay, step one, step two, oh we can't go on becuase we didn't get step three yet..." Yes there are many people who do that- I have students who have tried that and I point out that they are ignoring their horse in order to "do the program"- in fact I just wrote a post about it before coming to this forum!!! BUt not everyone gets into that step by step mentality.

But for the people who CAN"T POSSIBLY think on their own enough to learn as they go, the step by step is there so at least they can move forward- it may not be the best for their horse, but it is adequate! And it is certainly better to have a step by step guide to building a mediore relationship, than to have no relationship at all, which is where these people have started.

I've never said Parelli is the end all solution for horsemanship, but it has done so much good for the horse world as a whole, that the positive effects are undeniable. Even for those who do have a lot of self motivation and imagination, the parelli system offers a TON of inspiration, and in case you see somethingthat has you scrathching your head saying "how did they teach that?" there are step by step instructions to give you a basic idea!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 8:54 am 
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I agree totally Danee and while I don't follow PNH I'm certainly not in the ranks of the 'Parelli bashers' (I used one of his techniques just this morning while hacking in fact - bringing Zeno's head to my knee to 'switch him off' which I combine with TTouch ear work - result - a much calmer horse...! :lol: )

Perhaps I should have emboldened or italicised "CAN go wrong..." when people (as you aptly put it) "ignore the horse" in their pursuit of a goal. Sadly, not exclusive to Parelli followers... :(


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 9:27 am 
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Almost every system has something to learn from or has something one can use.

That is why we say: go and see every trainer and when you like what you see, take lessons, read all books, watch all videos.
Then decide what you can use and what not.

By restricting your self or another to one person or system, knowledge will be caged as a birth.
No man or woman on earth withholds all the information.

Not even Bianca, Miriam or me!

(Whahahaha!!! that last sentence is soooo a joke, I hope you understand! I for one have got soooo much to learn and I love that, having goals... keeps me fresh and humble :) )

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