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 Post subject: Re: Nepomuk
PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2011 5:15 pm 
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Donald Redux wrote:
Equine Vocalizations

German:
Wiehern
Brummeln

English:
Neigh
Whinny
Wuffle
Nicker
Bray

Other languages, anyone?

Donald, Altea, and Bonnie Cupcake


Nederlands / dutch
hinneken
gillen
brommen
snuiven


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2011 10:02 pm 
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Thanks, Inge! Maybe you can edit the english meanings to the dutch words as well, so we know which is which?
I get the meaning for all of them, except "gillen". Is that nicker?

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 16, 2011 5:12 pm 
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hmmm the right english word for that....
There is none i think...
but it come near by a mix of screeming and yelling

Kids can do it too when they not get what they wanted.
Horses can do it when they get left alone and still see the other horse.
A very high sound.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 16, 2011 5:30 pm 
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Ah, I get it!
That would actually be "gellen" in German and "yell" in English (although "schrillen" and "shrill" might be a better translation).

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 16, 2011 7:55 pm 
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maybe we have this put on tape so we can hear all the differences ;) just writing is quite difficult :smile:


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2011 7:07 pm 
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i was reading this book "de natuur van het paard" Dr. Marthe kiley-worthington
english version The Behaviour of Horses in Relation to Management and Training

there is a part written about horses and their communication about the difference in sounds and the meaning fo it.
i did not read it completly but there is still not enough information yet to say if each call have his own expression contents.
hmm interesting.....


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:50 pm 
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inge wrote:
maybe we have this put on tape so we can hear all the differences ;) just writing is quite difficult :smile:


Yes, it would help to hear the actual sound. It's important though, difficult as it may be, to use words to describe them because when we are talking with each other we don't have the recording, and we aren't very good at duplicating the sounds with our own voice. LOL

My mare has a sound that unless one refers to mules and one of the sounds they make (I do not know the name of the sound) one can't really identify it by words alone.

It's a breathy kind of sound similar to what many horses make at dinner time, yet with Altea she makes that mule sound accent. She lives with mules for a few years, and of course they adored her and followed her about.

Something about mules and white or light colored mares. Very strange how they instantly attach.

It's kind of a breathy "huff huff huff huff" that diminishes in volume.

Anyone know what it is?

Donald, Altea, and Bonnie Cupcake

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 2011 2:21 pm 
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:funny: :funny: :funny: ofcourse we know... :funny: :funny: no...(sorry)


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2012 1:14 pm 

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Horse behavior is always an interesting area of study. Some of the most interesting areas of behavior involve communication, whether the communication is done between horses or between horse and man.

There are several ways a horse can communicate. Vocalization and visually are just two of them. Horses have several different kinds of vocalizations.

A “neigh” is usually used as a greeting call, but is most often used during times that a foal is separated from its mare. A foal and mare that are separated will often neigh repeatedly until brought back together.

A “nicker” is often used by horses to indicate a care response. This is most often used when a horse and foal are reunited. Horse may also “nicker” at their owners, which is a sign of affection.

Snorts and roars can be used between horses and are often used when horses meet new horses. Roars can be used to help establish dominance in a new herd. Another interesting thing that happens when horses meet is that they usually put their noses together, nostril to nostril, to smell each other.

In terms of visual signs a horse gives, the most easily observed are those of the ears. The ears can be held in several positions and they all mean different things.

If the ears are held upright and erect this means the horse is alert or scared. You will often see a horse’s ear become erect after a loud noise, or when new horses are in the area.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2012 4:44 pm 
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Hi Chester, if I may expand a bit on your comments concerning horse vocalizations: I think it was Romy that acquainted us with the name, from the German, for a certain soft nasal sound horses make to express positive response to us or other horses - "wuffle," is the word she used, as I remember it.

Very fitting and I know of no word in English that captures it quite as well. You mention "nicker," and to me it appears, or sounds rather, to be a sharper sound than the wuffle. And too, while it may mean affection toward the human from the horse I find it more often to mean "it's about time you showed up to give me my breakfast."

Thus I consider it to mean anticipation of food or other pleasant events. Wuffle -> Pleasant Anticipation. When I was a kid, a groom for a time in a racing barn, that was the sound that greeted me each morning as I wheeled the feed cart around from stall to stall. Even when I moved on to galloping colts and fillies I came early to feed even though it was someone else's job. Still a most pleasant memory - and is strong in my mind and feelings when I go to feed my two in the morning now, sixty years later - and I hear again that soft anticipating wuffle.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2012 5:00 pm 
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Donald Redux wrote:
I think it was Romy that acquainted us with the name, from the German, for a certain soft nasal sound horses make to express positive response to us or other horses - "wuffle," is the word she used, as I remember it.


No, I did not come up with the word, nor is it a German word. In fact, it's English. And my role in this was only that the last few times this topic came up I tried to explain that the word "whuffling" as introduced by Wendy in Inocencio's diary actually is used for puffing out air, not for that cute little nickering sound. Here is the original post: Wendy introduces whuffling. :smile:


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2012 5:23 pm 
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LOL - just goes to show what the aging memory will come up with. Thanks for the clarification and correction.

What IS the German word for that sound, if there is one?

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2012 5:27 pm 
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Every now and then I remember to google up a subject under discussion. Wouldn't you know there would be a bunch of info on this subject:

http://www.google.com/search?q=horse+vocalizations&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

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Love is Trust, trust is All
~~~~~~~~~
So say Don, Altea, and Bonnie the Wonder Filly.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2012 5:48 pm 
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Donald Redux wrote:
What IS the German word for that sound, if there is one?


For the cute little nickering sound you could say "brummeln", which actually describes a humming noise, but it is quite common for the soft nicker as well. You already have it in your collection of equine vocalizations that you started on the first post of this thread.

For the "whuffling" as Wendy used it (blowing out air, for example if the horse has dust in his nose or is very relaxed) we would say "schnauben".


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 03, 2012 12:16 am 
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Romy wrote:
Donald Redux wrote:
What IS the German word for that sound, if there is one?


For the cute little nickering sound you could say "brummeln", which actually describes a humming noise, but it is quite common for the soft nicker as well. You already have it in your collection of equine vocalizations that you started on the first post of this thread.

For the "whuffling" as Wendy used it (blowing out air, for example if the horse has dust in his nose or is very relaxed) we would say "schnauben".


It is so obvious that English and German are very related. Both those words, like so many in German, seem to resonate in my ear and brain as being the "correct," sound for the meaning intended.

I used to ride a German motorbike, and I loved the owner's manual. Auspufrohr (sp) was my favorite word for a long time. LOL

And Links, and Reckts (sp again) too, favorites. They just sound right.

Of course I've a number of German speaking ancestors, a few I knew - so some ancient buried memories may be effecting how I see German.

Betcha every native English speaker here can figure out what all three of those words mean without any hints.
(I suspect, just as it once did, the word for that motorbike part is going to resonate in my head for the rest of the day....LOL)

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Love is Trust, trust is All
~~~~~~~~~
So say Don, Altea, and Bonnie the Wonder Filly.


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