The Art of Natural Dressage

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2007 5:07 pm 
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Mimicry
Animals (and also humans) tend to mimic the behaviour of their partners in their communication. That means that they show the same behaviour or expression as the other one. A human example is that you will probably smile when someone smiles at you. In most cases this mimicry (also called mirroring) happens without awareness in every kind of natural communication, but you can also use it for creating a refined communication with your horse and for teaching him new movements or behaviours. You just mimic the movements of your horse and reward him when he mimics you. Soon he will become more aware of your movements and try to imitate them. This helps you in teaching more difficult movements (e.g. Piaffe) without using pressure and in communicating with more subtle body language cues that can replace explicit cues. Another advantage is that it will make the communication more natural and increase rapport between you and your horse.


Last edited by Romy on Mon Dec 03, 2007 5:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2007 5:30 pm 
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Location: Quebec, Canada
Hi Romy:

Just a small question for you concerning (mimickry). What do you mean by reinforcing him when he mimicks me. do you mean reward him.
Refer to my daily training session for a question I have (don't want to make this topic too long).
Jocelyne


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2007 5:53 pm 
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Hi Jocelyne,

your question is answered in more detail in an earlier post in this topic (page 1). Just to summarize it: reinforcement means that a pleasant consequence follows a behaviour. Positive reinforcement means that a pleasant consequence is added, negative reinforcement means that an unpleasant stimulus is taken away. So reinforcement is the same as reward, only that the word itself focuses more on what will happen to the behaviour: it will occur more often or with more intensity. For several reasons it is best to use positve reinforcement (instead of negative), that means you can smile, give him a stroke, a treat or whatever he likes.

Warm Regards,
Romy

P.S.: I will change the word into "reward" in my explanation, maybe then it is more clear. Thanks for pointing it out. :D


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2007 11:51 pm 
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I have a little suggestion...under B, you have "Bow", and the picture is of an Obeisance or Front Crunch style of bow. There is also a one knee or two knee bow.

That photo could be moved to illustrate both the terms, "Front Crunch" or "Obeisance". There are a few photos floating around the forum now of one or two knee bows I think.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 11:03 am 

Joined: Mon Oct 22, 2007 2:26 pm
Posts: 239
Location: Estonia, Tallinn
A
AMBUATE

I put here link of ambuate- Nevzorov and Perst.
http://www.hauteecole.ru/en/photogaller ... d=74&gid=1

C
CAPRIOLE

Standing capriole
Image

The croupade and the ballotade are both preparing exercises for the capriol. There are two sorts of capriols - the standing capriole and the capriole. The standing capriole is a half air. The horse stands on its frontlegs and kicks out with its hindlegs, in other words it is a controlled lash out. The capriole is the air above the ground that is considered to be the most difficult exercise. The horse jumps up as in a ballotade and when the horse is highest up, and parallel to the ground, it lashes out. Also in this exercise it should land on its hindlegs or at least on all four legs. The capriol is very powerful and it looks as if though the horse explodes with power when it lashes out. This of course demands strength and suppleness. And of course a lot of balance and coordination.
http://www.akademiskridkonst.se/eng/mov ... l#ovanmark
http://www.le-site-cheval.com/figures/cabriole.php
http://www.lipizzaner.com/Capriole.asp

CROUPADE
Image
The croupade is much like the courbette. The difference is that the horse jumps only upwards instead of forward as in the courbette. The hindlegs are drawn much upward and placed as close as possible to the belly. Unfortunatly the croupade is also the name for the standing capriole, but to make things easy we will call it just a capriole and the croupade is left to the description above. The croupade, of course, demands that the horse can seperate the courbette from the croupade. It demands as much strength from the horse as the courbette and as much balance.
http://www.akademiskridkonst.se/eng/mov ... l#ovanmark
http://www.le-site-cheval.com/figures/croupade.php

H
HALF-PASS (APPUYER)

Image
Half-pass is a two-track exercise in which the horse moves sideways and crosses his legs.
http://www.cheval-haute-ecole.com/indexA.html

J
JAMBETTE

Image
http://www.le-site-cheval.com/figures/airs.php
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G15CFbIPebA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fs7UXTUX3YQ

M
MEZAIR

Image
The horse rears up and strikes out with its forelegs. It is similar to a series of levades with a forward motion (not in place), with the horse gradually bringing its legs further under himself in each successive movement and lightly touching the ground with his front legs before pushing up again. The meziar was originally called the courbette by the old dressage masters, and it is no longer practiced at the Spanish Riding School.
http://www.le-site-cheval.com/figures/mezair.php
http://www.lipizzaner.com/lipizzaner_frameset.asp

P
PESADE

Image

The pesade is almost exactly like the levade. The only difference in how it looks is that the horse always is above 45 degrees. This demands a bit less strength of the horse.
http://www.akademiskridkonst.se/eng/mov ... l#ovanmark
http://www.le-site-cheval.com/figures/pesade.php

W
SCHOOL WALK (Pas d’Ecole)

the School Walk (Pas d’Ecole) gives the horse strength, beauty and majesty. The classical School Walk is a raised walk, round, of diagonal properties, almost a Passage Walk. It is very different of the nowadays school walk, which is a beginning of Spanish walk. It demands well balanced horses who are generous, strong and limber, and who are ready for serious collection and capable of flexing their joints hard.
http://www.cheval-haute-ecole.com/indexA.html



I have to search good photos for these elements for the examples.
I think here in AND-encyclopaedia must write also exercises of the levels (topic: Natural Dressage Groundwork with the cordeo: the levels, for example what is mountain goat?). I found the video of jambette, now I know what it is- its Esprit´s favourite exercise :D

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http://wwwesprit.blogspot.com


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 4:33 pm 
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hey I found some more pictures, and also one of the pas d'ecole, because when I follow your link I just see a website
http://www.miscellanees.com/images/bogro017.jpg

http://www.miscellanees.com/b/bogros06.htm


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2008 12:24 am 
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Great posts!

(And now I feel even worse for not updating the encyclopaedia... :oops: )
But I will do so within a week!


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2008 10:38 am 

Joined: Mon Oct 22, 2007 2:26 pm
Posts: 239
Location: Estonia, Tallinn
Thank you Barbara, very good!!! :D

B
BALANCE (QUE)
I think it was called balance (que), its a element of NHE, Nevzorov is doing it with Lipisina, the horse´s hindlegs are standing and horse jumps only with frontlegs to the right and left. I saw it in the Nevzorov video "NHE principles".

I desperately want to find photos of the elements, what I wrote above free horse, without bits etc like pesade photo, very beautiful!!!

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http://wwwesprit.blogspot.com


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2008 10:17 pm 
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I found this:
http://www.atelier-equitation-classique ... hp/Accueil
Unfortunately I don't know French :( but it's based on Wikipedia. Maybe we could create something like this for AND? I know that Alex suggested it before.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2008 9:28 pm 
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I feel a lot of inspiration after painting my still life, so I decided to contribute some illustrations for AND Encyclopedia, so that we don't have to use photos from other websites 8) :P to start with -
BALLOTADE

Image

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2008 2:50 am 
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Location: Quebec, Canada
Ania,

You read my mind. I was thinking the other day taht it would be nice to integrate your drawings with the term.

And you are doing it. Great. Keep it up it sure helps.

Can Miriam include the drawing with the definition?

That will be awesome

Thanks al lot for your initiative

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2008 12:48 pm 
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Great picture, Ania! They would suit the encyclopaedia real nice if you could make them a little smaller (about the size of the photo of the Mezair above this post).

The only thing about drawings is that they feel less real than photo's, as if real horses can't reach such exercises. But with all these bits the photo's aren't that much fun to look at either, so if you want to make drawings of these photo's, you're welcome! :D


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2008 1:25 pm 
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maybe it's very simple, Ania makes drawings, we print them, take them to our horse, show it to him or her, read how it is supposed to look and then just take a picture when he does it ;)

I'll start teaching Beau to read, and than in a few years... ;)


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 12:35 am 
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I have a couple of requests for "R" words. I would like to know exactly the meaning of "rassemble" and "ramener". I only think I know what they mean. It would be nice to know for sure.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 7:28 pm 
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Since these terms are French, I did some research.

Ramener: General Decarpentry in his work "Equitation académique", describes the Ramener as the closing of the head angle with the neck. The poll being the most elevated part of the horse's body, the Ramener is complete when the horse's nose is vertical. If the head is behind the vertical the horse is no longer "ramener" but arched.

Image


Rassembler: it is the equilibrium or balance into which the horse position itself. Its weight is equally distributed between its front and back ends. When you look at the Versailles old masters portraits you find that the Rassembler requested then that the horse became quite heavy on its back end. The horses used then were mostly iberic. The horses now used in dressage, mainly the germanic, would not support such a rassembler. The rassembler will be accomplished at the 3 gates when the rider feels both impulsion and lightness. The horse seems to carry itself; the articulations (stifle,hock, pastern) bend under the body mass, the poll rises and the back rounds up. The piaffe is the purest form of Rassembler.

I guess Rassembler is Collection in English.

Image

In my English dictionnary:

Ramener is translated by "Position in hand". However, position in hand requests that not only the horse yields at the poll but also yields at the jaw.
Since we do not use bit I don't know if we can say anymore that our horses yield at the jaw.

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