The Art of Natural Dressage

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 26, 2011 4:41 pm 
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Location: provincie Utrecht
:cheers: sounds good :applause:
you've got it :yes: and now at work :funny:


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2011 9:45 pm 
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Location: Bend, Oregon, USA
This is a suuuuuuper cool collection of clicker videos. There are only 2 for horses and the rest are mostly for dogs...
http://drsophiayin.com/resources/videos

I think this one is my all-time favorite. It's of a lady retraining a dog who shows aggression, particularly when people blow in its face.
http://drsophiayin.com/resources/video_ ... ng_in_face

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2011 3:53 pm 
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Location: Georgia (USA)
Just a quick update since some of you asked to hear updates about the clicker training with the mustang. :)
Her owner has been watching Alexandra Kurklands DVD and loves it. The mare has responded quite well and almost immediately to the basics of CT, she's finally showing initiative and thinking "Oh! How can I earn a treat now? What do you want me to do!" ;) Yesterday we had a wonderful little walk, a first for her. I was walking Diego and brought him over to the grass where she was grazing the mustang mare. The horses eyed eachother as they grazed and listened to us talk - then we took them down to the ring for a little bit of walking. The mare followed behind Diego pretty happily and when we stopped to talk she stood, relaxed and then cocked a back hoof. Her owner was beyond thrilled, she says it's just seemingly taken the edge off of her nervousness in just one week of CT training. :f:

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2011 5:52 pm 
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Location: Pacific Northwest U.S.
Colinde~ wrote:
Just a quick update since some of you asked to hear updates about the clicker training with the mustang. :)

[...]

The mare followed behind Diego pretty happily and when we stopped to talk she stood, relaxed and then cocked a back hoof. Her owner was beyond thrilled, she says it's just seemingly taken the edge off of her nervousness in just one week of CT training. :f:


Why does +R with food rewards produce this result again and again with supposedly difficult horses?

Because lead mares, and Mother Maretm commonly reward with food, blocking the target horse from food for a moment, then releasing them to eat. Herd buddies share hay and grass,

CT with treats tells the horse you are friendly and like them and are a reward source for them.

According to herd dynamics almost any horse can find themselves with a subordinate as conditions change, or even when new herd members come and old members go.

So virtually all horses have an innate understanding of and are effected by rewards and positive behavior control associations. It comes from both instinct and teaching by Mother Maretm.

Donald, Altea, and Bonnie Cupcake

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So say Don, Altea, and Bonnie the Wonder Filly.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2011 7:51 pm 
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Location: Georgia (USA)
I thought this small update was worth posting:
Yesterday I got to see the Sugar's owner working with her on picking up her front hooves. :) It was great to watch. Aside from the previous trainer working to lift her hooves with ropes, nothing has been done on that front, and her owner was a bit nervous about bending down there around Sugar's hooves. After having such success with the C/T so far she felt confident enough to try working on hooves yesterday. Within the first 15 minute session between them she had Sugar lifting her hooves up from a touch to the back of the knee and a verbal "pick up"! :clap: The mare was happy, compliant and relaxed. Her owner was so happy she was nearly bouncing up and down. 8)

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2011 11:46 pm 
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Heehee, don'tchajustloveitthough?

I recall my first C/T success experience. I thought I'd become the next discoverer of sliced bread.

Does she know to always face the rear to pick up on a green horse? Hope so.

I can't recall if I've mentioned I'm a fan of Synalia methods, and my two have their body parts individually named. Bonnie still get's her right ear confused with her left ear, but it's jolly fun watching her trying to get it right as she walks up to me to my request, "give me your right ear Bonnie, please." Back and forth goes her head. But usually she works it out, and get's her treat - a deep ear massage.

Each of mine know pretty well and pick up their different hooves for me, left front, left hind (I don't say 'rear' as it sounds like "ear"), right hind, right front. It amuses but pleases my trimmer to find my mare standing with her hoof up for him as he steps to her side.

Bonnie knows probably 15 body parts now, but in her youthfulness gets over excited when I name them and as for a touch. Got to watch that "touch left hip to fingers, Bonnie." Guess I better ask her to touch it herself wit her nose.

Kudos to your friend. She is building a beautiful relationship.

Donald, Altea, and Bonnie Cupcake.

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Love is Trust, trust is All
~~~~~~~~~
So say Don, Altea, and Bonnie the Wonder Filly.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2011 11:10 am 
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Location: provincie Utrecht
:cheers: :applause: she have done great work!!


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2011 8:33 pm 

Joined: Thu Aug 12, 2010 3:52 pm
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I´ve been using the CT for some years now, Here in Norway the method gets a lot of criticism because people believe that the horse will start begging for treats all the time, what they´ve misunderstood, is that you got to click at the precise moment. I´ve never had a problem whit my pony being overwhelmingly focused on treats because of the CT, in fact, he already was, because he was handled a lot by kids, he learned that when he wanted, he could get anything, but whit CT, he understood that he had to do something, he had to suggest, and as a result, he started to love working(he hated it before), and when he gets the treat, hes more excited about it, because he gets a kick out of guessing, sugesting and managing to do things, it also brought back his self asteem, from a ero, upp to a firework of a pony, who loves to be whit humans, "work" and use his head to find solutions to what I´m asking him to do.
When it comes to CT, I personally think that it is one of the greatest ways to bring upp a horse, or to heal "wounded" horses, because whit positive training, if you click att the right moment, it can only do wonders, ofcourse, if you learn the horse a trick that could cause a problem, like rearing, spanish walk and so on, if the horse sugestes it, you should ask for something else, aways progress, don´t get stuck whit one task for to long, if you do, you might make the horse bored, and youve ruined that extra excitement whit the CT.

the one trainer that I would recommend you, is Ellen Ofstad http://www.ellenofstad.com/enghome.html

Good luck, love to hear from you again :f:
-Snoopy and Lia

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 5:20 pm 
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So good you push up this topic. How is the progress btw?? Any news?

And liasnoopy, good to hear that you have great experiences with CT, i love it too.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2012 4:27 pm 
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I'm not perfectly sure if this is the right place for it, but I found a nice introductory document for CT:
http://www.behaviorworks.org/files/worksheets/Behavior%20Toolkit.pdf

What caught my eye in particular about this document is the very first step of the outlined process: It says to first define the behaviour you want to see as result of the clickering process. You should use a positive description for the behaviour and you shouldn't use evaluating language to describe the behaviour.
This sounds simple at first, but I think it has profound implications. Evaluating the horse's behaviour, especially by human standards, is in my opinion a trap that springs too easily while handling horses.

What I found furthermore interesting is that these principles of avoiding evaluating language is exactly the foundation of Marshall Rosenberg's "Non Violent Communication", if anyone is familiar with that.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2012 9:01 pm 
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Houyhnhnm wrote:
I'm not perfectly sure if this is the right place for it, but I found a nice introductory document for CT:
http://www.behaviorworks.org/files/worksheets/Behavior%20Toolkit.pdf

What caught my eye in particular about this document is the very first step of the outlined process: It says to first define the behaviour you want to see as result of the clickering process. You should use a positive description for the behaviour and you shouldn't use evaluating language to describe the behaviour.
This sounds simple at first, but I think it has profound implications. Evaluating the horse's behaviour, especially by human standards, is in my opinion a trap that springs too easily while handling horses.

What I found furthermore interesting is that these principles of avoiding evaluating language is exactly the foundation of Marshall Rosenberg's "Non Violent Communication", if anyone is familiar with that.


I left your words because these are such valuable concepts and resources. I've not read Rosenberg but the concepts are very familiar to me.

May I add to the resource pool with my endorsement of this CT instructor, researcher, and expert - and she is most kindly and low key as well. You'd never know of her education if she didn't include it in her bio on her webpage. She looks like she's working in her back yard with mostly mini horses, and she is, but her knowledge is extensive in the horseworld. And her help and advice is based soundly on advanced basic principles of behavioral research back to the 30's and forward. She's a gem I almost missed. I wish her marketing were a little slicker, but she doesn't care ... she's solely about quality and support, and after finding out about her background I'm understand where he skill comes from. She was mentored by Karen Pryor, now there's a name to look up ... pretty much the Mom of clicker training, from dolphins to dogs.

Peggy Hogan offers beginner material and advanced material in such a wonderful way you won't even know you've passed from one to the other. It's the goals that make the difference, not the method or principles.

So if you can teach a horse to back up and clear a gate you wish to go through you can teach a horse to back, spin, turn, go at any gait, and do whatever trick he is physically capable of. I've followed a lot of clicker training teachers the past five years, and this is my number one choice.

She'll even online coach you from vids you make, or letters to her. Even by phone. The drawing below is actually from a photo. How'd you like to teach your horse to bring his feed bucket, and maybe clean up the grounds. LOL

http://thebestwhisperisaclick.com/catalog/

Image

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Love is Trust, trust is All
~~~~~~~~~
So say Don, Altea, and Bonnie the Wonder Filly.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2013 9:50 pm 

Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2008 9:58 pm
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Location: Western Cape, South Africa
I thought this was a lovely short video about clicker training explaining the 4 quadrants. It may be helpful to those that would like to start clicker training but don't really understand what it's all about :D
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFwpXUVGcho

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2013 11:13 am 
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Haha :funny: Oscar seems to be a fun horse to train :funny:

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2013 3:31 pm 

Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2008 9:58 pm
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Location: Western Cape, South Africa
I wished someone had shown me this when I first heard of clicker training.....such a cool and funny vid :applause: :funny:

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Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans. - John Lennon


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 Post subject: Clicker training?
PostPosted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 11:58 pm 

Joined: Fri Dec 20, 2013 2:26 am
Posts: 4
I want to start using the clicker to train my horse. Can anyone recommend a book or video that would help me to learn?


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