The Art of Natural Dressage

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2009 11:29 am 

Joined: Sat Sep 05, 2009 11:42 pm
Posts: 32
Location: Central Coast NSW Australia
Hi Susie,
thanks so much for that link to Dr Deb... Fantastic info there!
I'm re-thinking the whole riding thing now, maybe I have been too impatient.
I am a bit of an 'analytical' type, so reading the science behind the bone structure is a revelation.
Many "experienced" horse people have said to me "Of course you can get on him, just look how strongly built he is." I realise now that you can't tell just by looking! If anything, he probably needs MORE time than other breeds, with that mass of bone!

Funny thing is, I'm not even disappointed... I think we can have loads of fun on the ground for a while yet. Maybe I'll just have to lay over him now & then for a cuddle. Will see how we go.

Warmest,
Moyna & Hero

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The greatness of a nation & its moral progress may be judged by how its animals are treated.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2009 3:13 pm 

Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 2:02 pm
Posts: 1072
Location: UK Worcester/Hereford border
Moynz, thanks for realising I was n't trying to have a go at you personally. I think Dr.Deb does explain her science well.
I am lucky to be old enough to have had my early lessons with my great uncle, a real traditionalist who brought on nice young Thoroughbreds for racing, he rode polo, racing, hunting etc, but in India mostly between 1898 and 1920, so he was quite an old man when he patiently took me out on a pony, walking for miles through open spaces and deep forest in Sussex. Never did he raise his voice to horse or child, patient, quiet, consistent. He would never ride a youngster before 4 years old, but they had lots of walks out, games finding out what their tack was, longreining etc. His Jersey housecow was a quiet and companionable lady, always helpful at milking into her bucket, because she knew she was given understanding, consideration and no punishment.
I firmly believe that whilst traditionalists may have used bits and shoes, many of the full time professional grooms and heavy horse ploughmen, cared deeply for their charges, and worked as hard as the horses, yet cleaned the sweat, made a deep bed and fed those horses before ever seeking warmth and food for themselves.

So this part of the Ranger pdf has resonance for me, it is what I was brought up with:-
Bottom line: if you are one of those who equates "starting" with "riding", then I guess you better not start your horse until he's four.
That would be the old, traditional, worldwide view: introduce the horse to equipment (all kinds of equipment and situations, with the handler on the ground) when he is two,
add crawling on and off him at three,
saddle him to begin riding him and teaching him to guide at four,
start teaching him manouvers or the basics of whatever job he's going to do - cavalletti or stops or racing or something beyond trailing cattle - at five, and he's on the payroll at six.
The old Spanish way of bitting reflected this also, because the horse's teeth are n't mature (the tushes have n't fully come in, nor all of the permanent cheek teeth either) until he's six.
Love Susie xx

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Susie xx
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 3:58 pm 
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Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2008 2:32 am
Posts: 3270
Location: New York
Hi Moyna, and welcome to you and Hero!


I'm looking forward to hearing more about your adventures together.


Best,
Leigh

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 10:32 pm 

Joined: Sat Sep 05, 2009 11:42 pm
Posts: 32
Location: Central Coast NSW Australia
Quote:
Moynz, thanks for realising I was n't trying to have a go at you personally.


Hi Susie,
no worries at all, I appreciate your generosity & caring. :kiss:

G'day Leigh!
It's lovely to be here, I will keep posting!

Whinneys,
Moyna & Hero

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The greatness of a nation & its moral progress may be judged by how its animals are treated.


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