The Art of Natural Dressage

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PostPosted: Sun May 27, 2007 7:11 pm 
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The basic exercises


For the basic exercises and what they look like in real life, see the AND movie on this on Youtube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcctMBE89YA


When your horse knows the basis movements that prepare him for working at liberty and/or with the cordeo, you can teach him the cordeo-signals, because you have already established a subtle communication between you two.

The cordeo cues cue for four specific type of movements, both with the head, neck and entire body. that have several meanings at one. These meanings These four types of movement are:

1. Up and collect
Cue: Lifting the cordeo upwards
This cue asks for:
Flexion of the poll (ramener, bending the head into a collection-like position, Transition to halt, Back up

2. To the right
Cue: Lifting the cordeo sideways so that the right half of the cordeo comes off the neck and the left half embraces/blocks the left half of the horses' lower neck.
This cue asks for:
Flexion of the head and neck to the right(into the opening of the cordeo)
The shoulders moving to the right(into the opening of the cordeo)

3. To the left
Cue: Lifting the cordeo sideways so that the left half of the cordeo comes off the neck and the right half embraces/blocks the right half of the horses' lower neck.
This cue asks for:
Flexion of the head and neck to the left (into the opening of the cordeo)
The shoulders moving to the left (into the opening of the cordeo)

4. Down and stretch
Cue: Placing the cordeo-hand on the withers/manes, or softly pulling the cordeo down from under his neck.
This cue asks for:
The horse lowering his head and neck and therefore stretching his back. It can be asked both in halt and in movement, and is to become the default posture of the horse when he isn't collected.

These four directions are very easy to understand for the horse because of the preparation exercises. Also the groups of movements behind every cue are logical because the movements are built on top of each other . Teaching the horse to flex at the poll when you lift your cordeo and using that same (slightly longer or more backwards guiding) aid for halt and backing up, will mean that the horse will start to halt and back up with a good, collected neck position all of his own, which is very good for the development of both his neck and back muscles - and therefore for the development of collection.

So if you lift the cordeo in order to ask for flexion of the poll and the horse responds by walking backwards - don't correct him. He's doing the right thing and he's telling you that for flexing the poll your cue can become even smaller.


Exercises

Bending the neck to the right and to the left
In the exercises in preparation of teaching the cordeo you have already taught your horse to move away from pressure -without using any pressure at all. This cordeo cue means the same; you lift for example the right side of the cordeo away from the shoudlers. Because of that the left side embraces the lower neck and the right side opens up; your horse should move his head to the right. Some horses respond to this naturally already, so reward the for that! Then you can ask them to bend their head away and towards you, left and right.

If your horse doesn't respond like that immediately, you can tell him more clear what you ask from him by pointing with your hand, then touching with a finger, then with all your fingers on the side of his neck where he should bend away from. Reward for the slightest try, even if he only moves a millimeter to the right side!

Moving the shoulders to the right and left
When your horse really has mastered the bending of the neck on your cordeo cue, you can ask him to bend his neck away from you to the left. And then, instead of dropping the cordeo again, let it in the same position asking his neck to move further to this side. Let your horse think this over. Some will find the answer all by themselves. If not, you can try again another day and then use your hand and fingers on his neck as extra guide.

Flexing the poll / Ramener
This exercise is not the beginning of collection, but the beginning of correct using of the back in collection. Some want to teach the horse this exercise also by avoiding pressure, but we'd rather not. The neck is a fragile bodypart and the ramener should come from the horse discovering this stance by himself.

The aim is that in the end you pick up the cordeo from the withers so that it embraces the base of the neck and the horse flexes his head. To teach him this, you can use the method of avoiding pressure and place your hand on his nose and keep your hand over there untill the horse flexes at the poll and bends his head inwards. If he does so, you immediately let go and reward the horse. Then you combine your hand on the nose with picking up the cordeo, untill the horse bends at the poll at picking up the cordeo alone.

The other method is to teach your horse to follow your hand on his own. You place your hand a centimeter behind his lower jaw or chin and wait till your horse touches it. You praise him a lot, and then you slowly start to move your hand further back from the lower jaw untill the horse takes up the position you want. In the meantime you can also start touching the base of his neck and chest as cue for flexing the poll: you hold your hand out for him to touch and if he doesn't, you touch the front of his chest with the back of your hand to show him where you are. If he touches your hand, you reward him! The touching of the base of the neck not only keeps your horse focused, but most of all this is the place where the cordeo will embrace him when you ask for the flexing at the poll with the cordeo cue, so that the transition to cordeo is very easy, especially when you use the same voice-cue as you did before when asking him to touch your hand.

Backing up, halting
The cue for backing up is essentially the same as the cordeo cue for flexing at the poll: you raise the cordeo from the withers and then squeeze in it with your hand in the direction of the tail. Do not pull! Just give signals. If your horse knows the flexing at the poll, he will first try that, and seeing as the cues keep coming, then start rocking his weight backwards. Rewards for that immediately! The sooner you reward for the slightes try, the more willing your horse will become to show you that he can actually give you more movement in the right direction.

Stretching the head down
If the horse already knows the preparational lowering the head exercise, then this exercise won't pose any problems for him, as the cue to lower the head on the cordeo is almost the same as the cue for lowering the head when just stroking the neck.
An added benefit to this exercise next to the ones mentioned in the preparation exercises, is that it not only physically stretches and mentally relaxes the horse, but that the head stretched down also blocks energetic, forward and upward movements like the Spanish walk and rearing when you don't want those.

Walking on the cordeo
When these cordeo-exercises prove to be no problem anymore, you can start to practice them in walk: Ask your horse to walk with you at the height of his shoulders and then ask him to walk straight lines and big circles next to you, to halt, step backwards, flex his neck and flex at the poll, and then try the same from the other side.

If your communication is well established, you can try to see if you can also do the straight lines and big circle in trot. If your horse walks away from you, you just let the cordeo go, or if you have a leadrope attached to it, let it slip a little through your hands and then just walk with your horse from a distance, mimick his movements while staying at shoulder height and slowly move back to his shoulder again. If he turns to you or slow down when you do this, thank him! He is redirecting his attention to you, and that's the basis of all further training.

When moving, try to ask your horse to lower his head and reward for that. If your horse can walk relaxed with his head low and therefore with good backuse, he can also be taught to keep the relaxed back but now with a higher neck and flexed poll. You reward that when he offers it or when he reacts to your question, but also accept the lowering of the head in between when the horses'muscles grow tired and he needs to stretch them. Not keeping the muscles tight will make them strong, but exactly this tightening and stretching all the time!

Also, don't forget to pause during this high-concentration work frequently by taking breaks and run with your horse around without cordeo.

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Last edited by admin on Sun Sep 14, 2008 10:20 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2007 10:31 pm 
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Miriam, is there anything else you can tell us about using the cordeo for ramener. My filly knows the back up so well, that it is hard to give her the idea that this could mean somthing else!

I could put her butt into the courner, but I hate to "trap" her even though I don't beleive she would get frazzled at all.

Also, I tried having her touch my hand behind her chin- she will touch it anywhere else but there. I tried snapping so she knows it is there- no good. Any suggestions anyone?

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2007 10:49 pm 
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danee wrote:
Miriam, is there anything else you can tell us about using the cordeo for ramener. My filly knows the back up so well, that it is hard to give her the idea that this could mean somthing else!


Some short replies due to it being bed-time, 8), but a horse can learn several exercises with closely related aids seperately. So if you've taught your filly the ramener on the cue of lifting the cordeo, you can teach her to back up when you lift the cordeo and then move it backwards from the withers. Then they are still seperate exercises, but because the cues lie so closely to each other, you can cue for the ramener and immediately go on with the back up.


Quote:
Also, I tried having her touch my hand behind her chin- she will touch it anywhere else but there. I tried snapping so she knows it is there- no good. Any suggestions anyone?


Smaaaaaallllll steps is the clue. And a very good timing! There are other ways (pushing the horses nose into the right position, indeed placing his butt against the wall), but I would advice you not to use them. Not only because they harm the horses mental involvement in the training (just follow the pressure with your mind blank), but also because they harm you: you slip back into the demanding, problem fixing mode very easily if you use methods that put pressure on the horse and are designed to fix unwanted side-effects. While instead the aim is to find a common language together.

Small steps can be to first start to teach her to touch your hand with her nose when you hold it in front of her and snap your finger. That way the fingersnap becomes a real cue, not just an attention seeking device. Do that several times, several training sessions and ask her slowly to move bigger distances to reach your hand. Then you can not only move your hand away from her, but also downwards, to the ground with her head following. Then you can also ask for lateral flexion of the neck; following your hand with the nose to the left and the right, and also upwards inwards. The key is to reward for the smallest steps forward. THink in a millimeter a time, and only ask for that millimeter too! So if you hold your hand under her chin to ask the ramener, first touch her chin yourself and reward for that. Show her that this touching is really good a couple of times - and she will go and start to look for that touch. Then you don't touch her chin, but hold your hand 1 mm behind her chin - and immediately reward when she nods only a little to reach for it.

That's the key to all the other exercises too; take really small steps and reward every millimeter of progress - also your Spanish walk. ;)


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 6:48 am 
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Quote:
first touch her chin yourself and reward for that


Oh my goodness! Does it have to be that easy. :shock: Couldn't you have made up something really confusing so I wouldn't have to feel guilty for not figuring it out for myself!!! :D :lol: :D (by the way, we need more emoticons!)

I can't believe all these beginner PHNers that can't figure out how to break things into smaller steps. Now that I find myself in the same boat I can see why- they don't get the big picture of how it all works. They can't break something that is invisible into parts. I'm steadily seeing more and more of the picture!!! I'm realizing I won't have to change many techniques or methods- just my attitude. Then I'll see that it is smart to reward the horse for something that I did.

Miriam- you are opening so many doors for me!

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 9:34 am 
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danee wrote:
I can't believe all these beginner PHNers that can't figure out how to break things into smaller steps. Now that I find myself in the same boat I can see why- they don't get the big picture of how it all works. They can't break something that is invisible into parts.


You could be right in that... I think Parelli (minus the fases) is great because it reminds you of the things you need to agree on with your horse to become safe, but the big drawback for the human is that you're the one asking, demanding, pressuring all the time. You're stimulated to think like a human; task oriented, self-righteous - essentially like Parelli himself describes it: like a predator!

That works really well as long as you have the means to convice your horse that your way is the only option anyway. But when you're then faced with a horse that's free, you suddenly don't know what to do anymore, because you can't convince him that your way is better than his and that he's the one who should comply. We act towards horses just like missionairs going to heathen countries to christen them. We have the knowledge, experience and know how they should react, and they should go with that...

Instead, when you teach a horse at liberty or with the cordeo, you need to toss all that human egotism out of the window, because thinking from a human viewpoint is just not going to help you when confronted with a free horse! The answer to that problem is really simple: stop thinking from a human point of view, start thinking from a horses' point of view. And not in the debilitating doninance-ranking stuff, but in motivating, explaining, inspiring.

That's why the first exercise; doing nothing is sooooo important for us humans - and then get in contact, teach the horse only from the horses' point of view, on his mark.

Somewhere (I forgot where! :oops: ) you wrote about a sour, old, dominant mare, and how you get her to submit to these exercises. The answer is really simple: you won't. Sour old dominant mares are the mentally strongest horses in the world. They are mentally so strong and intelligent that they simply look down on all your clumsy attempts to let them submit to your cordeo work. When you're good at upping fases, you can get them to do a Parelli-yoyo game, but such a mare will still look down on you - especially because you so eagerly degraded yourself to using force when something doesn't go like you wanted it to go. They look down on force, pressure, tasks, goals and other things we impose on them, because they can get their peers to do absolutely anything without all that. Those horses are professional off-the-road mountain bikers, and we - when it comes to communication still on childrens bikes with sideweels - tell them what to do.

These horses know what they're worth, and they see all our flaws into the smallest details. They know that we are totally blind, know absolutely nothing about ourselves and the rest of the world, that we have very limited powers of compassion and that when we would be stripped of all the means of forcing another, we are totally helpless. They know that we would feel so humble if we could really see the creature that's in front of our eyes - instead of the stigma 'Oh, she's so lazy, but when you show her who's the boss at the start of the training she'll be okay'. So that's where this AND training system starts. Being humble. Sitting or just being with the horse and doing nothing. Not only to get out of the human thinking box yourself, but also to show the horse that you know that really she's in charge. And that you will from now on respect that. And when she believes that, you can start to see if she is that trusting that she will also do a movement for you.

So I would say: there's your teacher. The best teacher you could find. Of course your successes will be faster if you take a highly human-oriented, high-spirited horse because they will ignore all your predator human thinking and still follow you, they won't protest too much against energy wasting exercises only because you want to see them now. So your pictures will get really impressive very soon and other people will admire your succes (and will be drawn to this method for it's obvious high succes rate :roll: ) - but these horses allow you too much, and you yourself won't change your ways of thinking away from the tasks, goals, exercises, pressure, sefl-righteousness. You won't learn to think from within the horse.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 5:42 pm 
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Hmmm, True.

Maybe I'll try to sceudal more time for Chassy (QH matriarch) and try straight AND with her while I slowly wean Asia and I onto it while finishing our L3.

I truly won't have expectations as she isn't really "my project", so if notihng happens for weeks, i will truly see it as no loss. That could help me change my perspective A LOT!!!!

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 9:49 pm 
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danee wrote:
I truly won't have expectations as she isn't really "my project", so if notihng happens for weeks, i will truly see it as no loss. That could help me change my perspective A LOT!!!!


That sounds like a really great idea, wow! Could you keep a diary on what you learn from both horses? That would be very insteresting and educational for us too! :D


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 11:13 pm 
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The problem is finding time for both, but I'll definitly give it a shot!

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2007 3:57 pm 
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I thought I would add in here how I taught Tamarack the ramener in the cordeo. Since all horse/people combinations are different, then the methods and approaches are going to vary a bit for every horse.

Tamarack showed me he was really good at picking up verbal cues. He is very, very fast to learn words. So it helps a lot to have a verbal cue in order to transition from a touch or lure into ramener, to the light lift of the cordeo as a cue.

In the beginning, I taught Tamarack to follow my hand behind his chin, and using a clicker and food rewards, he figured that one out very quickly. As soon as I could, I moved my touch cue from his chin, to the front of the neck, at the base, where the cordeo would touch when lifted. I thought this would make the transition to the cordeo easier.

Well, it didn't exactly work out that way. Tamarack's first response to the lifting cordeo was to back up (just like Danee's mare). Apparently he was cuing off more than my touch on his neck, because without me reaching to his neck to cue the ramener, he didn't understand what I was asking...so his first guess was to back up away from the touch.

I didn't (and still don't) like to control the situation to the point of putting him in a corner so he couldn't back up, because my instinct told me that since he felt he needed to move when he felt the cordeo lift, that he would likely then decide to go sideways. So we stayed out in the open. No, the problem wasn't that he was being problematic, it was that he just didn't understand. I needed to make the question clearer. I didn't want him to attempt to answer the question with no reward for an improper guess too many times. I didn't want to frustrate him. So how to make it clearer and easier for him?

I decided to put the movement on verbal cue so I could eliminate the body language he expected. It's not something I shout so everyone can hear, but the cue I use is "look pretty" :D .

He picked the verbal cue up quickly. I could then keep my hands away from him, and verbally cue him into ramener.

So we tried the cordeo again. BUT...I made the touch of the cordeo (the lift) a feathery touch at first...like a fly landing on his neck, while asking him to "look pretty". Success! He got it! YES! CLICK and reward! Not a single step backward!

I was very careful not to put too much pressure on the cordeo, and as a result of that, he is now starting to offer ramener when I just reach for the cordeo, and before I even touch it.

When I do ask him to back up with the cordeo, he is arching his neck nicely in a very pretty reverse, and even now, when he began to offer "backing to hand" (or backing over me) at liberty with no cordeo at all, he will hold his own head in ramener even then. Pretty cool.

I am so in love with Tamarack's mind.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2007 11:49 am 
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I have a question about backing up, which could also be a general question on why/when to use the cordeo. When I was in the NHE forum, I asked a similar question there, but there were no real answers, only principle discussions and so I left (and was banned shortly afterwards).

But back to the question: Should I use the cordeo for backing up? Why? What benefits would I have?
Karen already wrote me a wonderful reply elsewhere, on how the cordeo might help us in collection. But what I´m asking about now is not about collection (the "how to do?"), but about tasks and exercises ("what to do?").

When I ask my horses to back up, I look at them very directly. If they don´t attend me and therefore this doesn´t work, I stand more straight. Of course it is neither the looking nor the standing per se, what makes them back up, but that they know what I want them to do. It´s the same for halting. On the ground I either stop (when I was moving myself) or lose my tension (if I want a slow relaxed halt) or freeze (if I want a very abrupt halt). While riding it is almost the same. Either breathing out a little bit more noticably (slow halt) or freezing (halt from trot or (if he is really good) from canter).

So do you think that I miss something or do something wrong when I only use body language and no cordeo? What additional benefit would we have when using the cordeo?


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2007 1:02 pm 
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I think that it's not wrong. For example, I used cordeo as a cue for backing, and sometimes my filly confuses it when I ask for ramener. She doesn't know if she should go backwards, or "upwards". So it depends on what cues you have. There should be clear difference between one cue and another.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2007 4:10 pm 
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puhhh it´s very difficult for me to read all this things in english :shock:

to read and understand

-- something is like PNH -- something like circensic lessions

and I do my own from all this things - Shir Khan and Romeo reacts of hand signals for comeing, back, go right or left, fellow me, lay down and so on

but I should like to ride Romeo in future without snaffle/bridle or so ...

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2007 5:01 pm 
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Quote:
Some short replies due to it being bed-time, , but a horse can learn several exercises with closely related aids seperately. So if you've taught your filly the ramener on the cue of lifting the cordeo, you can teach her to back up when you lift the cordeo and then move it backwards from the withers. Then they are still seperate exercises, but because the cues lie so closely to each other, you can cue for the ramener and immediately go on with the back up.


I re-read this entire, wonderfully educational thread (thank you Miriam, again and again!), and am very proud of how well Tamarack has learned (and is learning) the cues from the cordeo...but I'm particularly struck by how well he can feel very slight differences in cues. For instance, he now knows the difference between stopping, backing up, and ramener (which now includes stepping under with the hind feet - a partial Goat on a Mountain Top). It is, literally, a matter of degrees.

Lifting firmly (but not pulling!) straight up with the cordeo tells him to arch his neck and step his hind feet forward. We are still working at transitioning this into movement...a slow process for he and I, as I really don't know what I'm doing :lol: but it will come.

Lifting the cordeo and angling it back just a few inches, means to slow down or stop (along with leg/weight cues when he is finally ridden, will be a half halt or full halt).

Not lifting the cordeo quite as much as in stopping, and angling it back further - several more inches, means to back up.

The differences between these three is quite subtle. A little bit of pressure difference, and a little bit of angle (degree) differences.

Then there is another set of similar cues. Go left or go right, is very similar to the cues for Spanish walk, left foot, or right foot, and is also very simliar to the cue for shoulder in left or right.

For left or right, I use one hand on the cordeo, and simply neck rein as softly and delicately as I can. Lift straight up and tip the cordeo to the right for right, left for left. Very simple, however the bend is something that must be included and takes a little more time and patience (and way more rewards). tamarack is just now learning to bend away from me...soemthing that takes even more patience and more rewards (he loves working on this...the clicks and treats come fast a furious!).

For Spanish Walk, I take up the cordeo in two hands, lift gently, then lift my right hand a bit higher, directly up, to cue the right foot, or I lift my left hand a bit higher to cue the left foot, while taking care not to lean the off side of the cordeo against his neck...does that make sense the way I explain it? For the Spanish walk the cordeo is held away from his neck on both sides. At this point, he is still learning, and sometimes confuses the cues for left foot or right foot, based more on where his back feet are placed and where his balance is...so I need to refine this a little (ok, a lot, but he's getting there!) and be a little more mindful of where his feet are when I ask him...until he's at a point where he can place his feet on his own, to follow through with the proper response to the cue. I work hard to make sure things are set up so he is more likely to "guess" correctly.

For Shoulder in (or leg yield) to the right, I again use two hands on the cordeo, lift both subltly to tell him that a cue is coming, then I lean the right hand part of the cordeo against his neck to cue a leg yield to the left, with his head and body curved around the touch of the cordeo and my arm resting on his girth area. Or I of course lean the left hand part of the cordeo against his neck to leg yield to the right. This will make a very nice Shoulder In as he learns to follow my gaze (I look forward, we move forward).

It really is amazing how they can interpret very subtle differences in the cues, if you are very careful to be consistent in how they are used.

Once I begin riding him, my weight or leg cues will replace some of the two-handed use of the cordeo, and I should be able to use only one hand for all the movements.

I think!


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2007 7:05 pm 
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This is extremely well explained. I will print it and try again with Bravada unless she tries to bite again. She has not done it since I no longer use the cordeo.

I will see if it is the cordeo because she does not see it in her blind spot. That was the best explanation I came up with so it is not personal. :wink:

But it could be all the confusion of my messages and cues.

I will start again with your specific cues and lots of treats.

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2008 7:41 pm 
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[quote="Miriam"]Level I: 2. Teaching the cordeo

Hello everyone. I'm new here!

And of course, I have a lot of questions...
:wink:

Do you give your horse a treat everytime he does it well. I mean, do I approach these exercises in the same way as clickertraining? Just asking and if the right attempt or movement is shown: a treat. And when the horse understands the exercice diminuish the treats?

What do you mean exactly by flexing? Is it bending the horses nose to his side (belly), like the bending Parelli asks or is it just more like looking in the right or left direction. (stelling in Dutch),


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